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Scientists To Build World's First 'Artificial SunShade' To Tackle Climate Change

The human constructed 'sunshade' would mimic big volcanic eruptions

By: Daniel Newton  |@NeonNettle
 on 5th April 2018 @ 7.29pm
scientists are set to build an artificial giant sunshade in order to dim the sun © press
scientists are set to build an artificial giant sunshade in order to dim the sun

In another attempt to combat 'Climate Change' scientists are set to build an artificial giant sunshade in order to dim the sun and protect the earth from harmful rays.

Solar geoengineering experts are hoping that the chemical sunshade would be 'less risky' than the harmful effects of rising global temperatures.

The human constructed 'sunshade' would mimic big volcanic eruptions that naturally cool with earth with volcanic ash covering the sun.

the solar geoengineering studies may be helped by a new  400 000 research project © press
The solar geoengineering studies may be helped by a new $400,000 research project,

Twelve scholars, from countries including Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Ethiopia, India, Jamaica, and Thailand, wrote in the journal Nature on Wednesday that poor people were at most risk to global warming and should be more involved.

The Express reports: Lead author Atiq Rahman, head of the Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies, said: "The overall idea (of solar geoengineering) is pretty crazy but it is gradually taking root in the world of research.”

The solar geoengineering studies may be helped by a new $400,000 research project, the Solar Radiation Management Governance Initiative (SRMGI), which is issuing the first call for scientists to apply for finance this week.

The SRMGI is financed by the Open Philanthropy Project, a foundation backed by Dustin Moskovitz, a co-founder of Facebook, and his wife, Cari Tuna, the scientists wrote.

Experts

The fund could help scientists in developing nations study regional impacts of solar geoengineering such as on droughts, floods or monsoons, said Andy Parker, a co-author and project director of the SRMGI.

Mr. Rahman said the academics were not taking sides about whether geoengineering would work.

Among proposed ideas, planes might spray clouds of reflective sulfur particles high in the Earth's atmosphere.

The experts wrote: ”The technique is controversial, and rightly so. It is too early to know what its effects would be: it could be very helpful or very harmful.”

A UN panel of climate experts, in a leaked draft of a report about global warming due for publication in October, is skeptical about solar geoengineering, saying it may be "economically, socially and institutionally infeasible”.

Some of the best pictures of the Icelandic volcanic ash cloud last time it erupted in 2010 and what we could be in for if the volcano erupts again

Among risks, the draft obtained by Reuters says it might disrupt weather patterns, could be hard to stop once started and might discourage countries from making a promised switch from fossil fuels to cleaner energies.

Still, Mr. Rahman said most developed nations had "abysmally failed" so far in their pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions, making radical options to limit warming more attractive.

The world is set for a warming of three degrees Celsius (5.7 Fahrenheit) or more above pre-industrial times, he said, far above a goal of keeping a rise in temperatures "well below" 2C (3.6F) under the 2015 Paris Agreement among almost 200 nations.

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